Presences
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September 26 to December 19, 2020
Esker Foundation
Samuel Roy-Bois
Samuel Roy-Bois’ practice is concerned with the conceptual and material definition of space and the ways the built environment and manufactured things contribute to our understanding of the world. Through sculpture, site-specific installation, and photography, Roy-Bois examines relational networks of objects and their complex philosophical considerations: How do we define ourselves through the creation of structures? Is it possible to conceive of one’s existence outside any material linkage? We make things, but are things also making us?

For this new body of work, Presences, Roy-Bois has created an ensemble of constructed and found objects that consider our contemporary material knowledge. His discrete architectural sculptures act as vessels for everyday things and are separated from the gallery’s architecture by platforms. This series of site-specific improvisational installations present everyday objects in new ways, blur the boundaries between art and life, and shift ordinary things and spaces into a poetic dimension. By connecting sculpture, everyday objects, floor, and ceiling, Roy-Bois manipulates the gallery space as a strategy to create a genuine and direct relationship with the viewer, and his use of everyday items offers a way of understanding our relationship to our environment.

Samuel Roy-Bois: Presences is organized and circulated by the Kamloops Art Gallery. Support for the development and production of new works for the exhibition provided by Esker Foundation.

Samuel Roy-Bois
Sovereign (ladder and mattress), 2019
chromogenic print
Image: Courtesy of the Artist

Curated by Charo Neville, Curator, Kamloops Art Gallery
View images of the exhibition here.
February 20 to September 20, 2020
Musée regional de Rimouski
Jin-me Yoon
Jin-me Yoon’s C-print (it is this/it is that), 2004 is on loan to the Musée d’art de Joliette for inclusion in the touring exhibition Jin-me Yoon: Ici ailleurs d'autres spectres. Curated by Anne-Marie St-Jean Aubre, this serves as the first survey exhibition offering an overview of Jin-me Yoon’s career spanning more than 25 years.

The exhibition was shown at the Musée d’art contémporain des Laurentides September 8 to November 3, 2019 and at the Musée regional de Rimouski, February 20 to May 31, 2020.

Jin-me Yoon
(it is this/it is that), 2004
lightjet C-print with overlay and acrylic surface mount
vertical diptych; each panel 74 x 126 cm
Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, purchased with financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program
Photo: Rachel Topham Photography

Curated by Anne-Marie St-Jean Aubre
View images of the exhibition here.
January 11 to June 13, 2020
Esplanade Arts and Heritage Centre
Joane Cardinal-Schubert
Joane Cardinal-Schubert’s Birch Bark Letters to Emily Carr: House of All Sorts, 1991 is on loan to the University of Calgary’s Nickle Galleries for inclusion in the touring exhibition The Writing on the Wall: Works of Dr. Joane Cardinal-Schubert, RCA. Curated by Lindsey Sharman of the Nickle Galleries, the exhibition reflects the cyclical nature of Joane Cardinal-Schubert’s (1942-2009) work, including pivotal paintings, drawings, prints, collage, ceramic, and installation. The tour was shown at the Nickle Galleries, September 21 to December 16, 2017, the Red Deer Museum, May 5 to August 12, 2018, the Kenderdine Art Gallery | College Art Galleries at University of Saskatchewan, Feb. 1 to April 27, 2019, the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, June 14 to September 8, 2019 and the Esplanade Arts and Heritage Centre, January 11 to March 28, 2020.
Joane Cardinal-Schubert
Birch Bark Letters to Emily Carr: House of All Sorts, 1991
acrylic and collage on paper
101.6 x 127.0 cm
Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery
Photo: Cory Hope
Curated by Lindsey Sharman
View images of the exhibition here.
November 30, 2018 to June 1, 2019
Kamloops Museum and Archives
Ted Smith
The late Kamloops painter Ted Smith’s acrylic tempera on canvas painting Spring Beach #5, 1969, was on loan to the Kamloops Museum and Archives for inclusion in the exhibition Ted Smith: Ideal Forms, November 30, 2018 to June 1, 2019.

Ted Smith
Spring Beach #5, 1969
acrylic tempera on canvas
59.4 x 81.3 cm
Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, gift of the Kamloops Arts & Crafts Club
Photo: Cory Hope

Curated by Matt Macintosh
View images of the exhibition here.
September 28, 2018 to January 27, 2019
Museum of Vancouver
Jin-me Yoon
Jin-me Yoon’s (it is this/it is that), 2004 was on loan to the Museum of Vancouver for inclusion in the exhibition In/Flux: Art of Korean Diaspora, September 28, 2018 to January 27, 2019. This exhibition featured selected works of Jin-me Yoon, Junghong Kim and Jin Hwa Kim, artists originally from the Republic of Korea now based in the Vancouver area.

Jin-me Yoon
(it is this/it is that), 2004
lightjet C-print with overlay and acrylic surface mount
vertical diptych; each panel 74 x 126 cm
Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, purchased with financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program
Photo: Rachel Topham Photography

Curated by Jillian Povarchook, Curator and Josh Doherty, Design
View images of the exhibition here.
January 13 to March 18, 2018
Kelowna Art Gallery
Gary Pearson
Two works by Gary Pearson – Under the Blue Palms, 2005 and When I get to Baton Rouge, 2005 – were on loan to the Kelowna Art Gallery, Kelowna, BC for inclusion in the major solo exhibition Gary Pearson: Short Fictions. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue co-published with Black Dog Publishing, and includes essays on Pearson’s work by Aasron Peck, Michael Turner and curator Liz Wylie, as well as a transcript of an interview with the artist by writer and curator Ihor Holubizky.
Gary Pearson, When I Get to Baton Rouge, 2005, oil and oil enamel on canvas, 198.5 x 167.5 cm, Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, Purchased with financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program, Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Ihor Holubizky
View images of the exhibition here.
January 12 to April 7, 2018
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at UBC
Allyson Clay
Allyson Clay’s two silkscreened photographic works on canvas, Some places in the world a woman could walk: Regina, 1993, and Some places in the world a woman could walk: Voices from the street, 1995, were on loan to the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia for inclusion in the exhibition Beginning with the Seventies: Glut, January 12 to April 7, 2018

Allyson Clay
Some places in the world a woman could walk: Regina, 1993
acrylic, silkscreen, photograph on canvas
61.0 x 122.0 cm
Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, gift of the Artist
Photo: Cory Hope

Curated by Lorna Brown
View images of the exhibition here.
November 11, 2017 to February 26, 2018
Audain Art Museum
A.Y. Jackson
Three works by the Group of Seven artist A.Y. Jackson were on loan from our collection to the Audain Art Museum in Whistler, BC for the exhibition Stone and Sky: Canada’s Mountain Landscape. Curated by Darrin Martens in recognition of Canada’s sesquicentennial, the exhibition explored how Canadian artists have interacted with the monumentality and vastness of mountain vistas over time. With over 100 objects on loan from 20 different public and private collections, Stone and Sky is the largest and most comprehensive art historical project that the Audain Art Museum has thus far undertaken; the exhibition is also accompanied by a book with essays by Martens, Roger Boulet and Lisa Christianson. The Kamloops Art Gallery was delighted to lend South of Razor Mt, BC, 1914; Mount Paul, Kamloops, BC, 1945; and Five Mile Glacier, Mt. Robson, 1914 for inclusion in the exhibition.
A.Y. Jackson, South of Razor Mt., B.C., 1914, oil on panel, 21.7 x 27 cm, Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, Gift of E.F. Anthony Merchant, © Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa, Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Darrin Martens
View images of the exhibition here.
September 14 to November 5, 2017
Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, BC
Tania Willard
Tania Willard’s Pine Triptych: Before We Were Ghosts, Listening to Ghosts, Becoming Ghosts, 2009, was on loan to the Burnaby Art Gallery for inclusion in the exhibition Tania Willard: dissimulation, September 14 to November 5, 2017. The exhibition presented multidisciplinary work by artist/curator Tania Willard (Secwépemc Nation), alongside her collaborators Gabrielle Hill, Peter Morin, her family, home community and Secwépemc lands and territories.
Tania Willard Pine Triptych: Before We Were Ghosts, Listening to Ghosts, Becoming Ghosts, 2009 spray paint and acrylic on canvas, digital projection 213 x 457.2 cm Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, purchased with financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program Photo: Ray Perreault
View images of the exhibition here.
June 30 to November 3, 2017
Kamloops Museum and Archives, Kamloops, BC
Dana Claxton
Dana Claxton’s Baby Boyz Gotta Indian Pony, 2008, from The Mustang Suite, was on loan to the Kamloops Museum and Archives (KMA) for inclusion in the exhibit riverpeoplenationstatepeople, June 30 to November 3, 2017. Curated by Secwépemc guest curator Tania Willard, riverpeoplenationstatepeople is a set of displays, revisions, questions and responses for attaching Kamloops' cultural history to an ongoing process of self-evaluation. Starting with stories of the first people of this region told through the voices of Secwépemc Museum & Heritage Park and Stk'emlupsemc te Secwépemc Nation and Secwépemc guest curator Tania Willard, a record of Secwépemc experience and cultural production has been placed at the centre of the KMA's permanent exhibition of regional history.
Dana Claxton Baby Boyz Gotta Indian Pony, 2008 from The Mustang Suite. c-print 152.4 x 121.9 cm Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grants program, the Jann LM Bailey Foundation Fund held by the Kamloops Foundation, and a private donation by Rick Erickson. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist
Curated by Tania Willard
View images of the exhibition here.
Liz Magor
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June 22 to September 5, 2016
Musée d’art Contemporain de Montréal, Montréa
Liz Magor
Liz Magor’s Humidor (brown) 6/6, 2004 was on loan to the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal for the exhibition Liz Magor. Co-curated by MACM curator Lesley Johnstone and art historian Dan Adler, the exhibition ran from June 23 to September 5, 2016.

This exhibition promises a non-chronological survey of sculptural and installation works from one of Canada’s most important and intriguing conceptual artists of her generation. Highlighting a career that has spanned over forty years, this exhibition juxtaposes recent pieces with works from earlier in Magor’s career and draw attention to the thematic and emotional range of her practice. Liz Magor lives and works in Vancouver, BC. She was recently awarded the Gershon Iskowitz Prize (2014), and is the recipient of the Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement (2009) and the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts (2001).

Liz Magor
Humidor (brown) 6/6, 2004
polymerized gypsum, tobacco
Collection of the Kamloops Art Gallery, purchased with financial support of the Province of BC

Curated by Dan Adler
View images of the exhibition here.
May 10 to October 16, 2016
UBC Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, BC
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s An Indian Act Shooting the Indian Act, Healey Estate, Northumberland, September 14th, 1997 was on loan to UBC Museum of Anthropology for the exhibition Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories.

This major exhibition and coinciding publication promise colour and controversy, pop and Surrealist-inflected landscapes, ovoids, bullets, masked oil barons, spirit and abstraction in selected works that shape a politicized approach to Northwest Coast art. Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun is an artist of Salish and Okanagan descent who lives and works in Vancouver, British Columbia. He has been painting for over 30 years, with the imperative to honour Indigenous rights to the land fuelling much of his output. His contribution to discourses about modern Aboriginal and Northwest Coast art are pointed and polemical. From An Indian Act: Shooting the Indian Act to his Manifesto of Ovoidism, Yuxweluptun’s work makes explicit the colonial history of Canada as the condition within and against which he lives, works, and paints.
Curated by Tania Willard (artist and independent curator, Secwepemc Nation), Karen Duffek (MOA Curator, Contemporary Visual Arts & Pacific Northwest)

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