September 24 to December 31, 2016
Central Gallery
Margaret Dragu
Sarah Anne Johnson
Luanne Martineau
Pascal Grandmaison
Zoe Kreye
Jeremy Shaw
Flesh, organs, eyes to the soul, under my skin, silhouette, inner voice, scars – the human body, its physical form, internal experience, external representation and metaphoric existence in the world is intimately familiar to us all. The body is deeply personal and inescapably public. It has been the central subject of a wide range of study within medical, spiritual, philosophical and sociological disciplines.

Embodiment and phenomenological experience can include but are not exclusive to social bodies, political bodies, differently abled bodies and gendered bodies. They encompass inclusive and exclusive spaces, personal and governmental rights, and technological or scientific experimentation. The body has also been the subject of artistic expression since the first recorded mark, often a record of how bodies were perceived and upheld at particular time periods, reflecting economic status, social morals and gender roles. Artists of the last few decades have been interested in exposing the power dynamics implicit through the representation of the body in a multitude of forms.

This exhibition looks at this topic by way of an open and fluid inquiry. Rather than foregrounding representations of the body tied to identity, the exhibition, like its title indicates, is porous and flexible, experiential and visceral. The work of this group of Canadian artists addresses the body in relation to knowledge, intimacy, loss, death, class, race, community, aging, architecture, nature, abstraction, movement and intervention.

It includes Margaret Dragu’s cumulative archive of performances and relational workshops addressing iterative decay, memory loss and personal legacy with a primary focus on the body as a source of knowledge. Zoe Kreye’s installation represents two community-based projects emerging from an invitation to perform the body in relation to sculptural objects and built spaces. Jeremy Shaw offers an experience for one person at a time that takes the viewer into a hypnotic experience of memory and personality. Sarah Anne Johnson’s installation translates her grandmother’s traumatic experience as a hospital patient by way of the artist’s own body and the viewer’s navigation of a clinical space, while Pascal Grandmaison’s ethereal videos provide a mesmerizing doubling of natural and bodily phenomenon. Luanne Martineau's soft sculptures evoke internal and external body parts through ambiguous forms that oscillate between figuration and abstraction. Each of these artists explores the notion of embodiment through an inimitable approach to our common experience of inhabiting a body.

Coinciding performances and workshops with movement practitioners integrate with the exhibition to activate the space and the exhibition’s theme.
Installation view of All membranes are porous showing works by Pascal Grandmaison:
at left, DISSOLUTION I, 2015
video projection, 4:44 minutes;
and at right, NOSTALGIE 2 (2015)
video projection, 8:38 minutes
Courtesy of the Artist
Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Charo Neville, Kamloops Art Gallery
View images of the exhibition here.
September 17 to October 29, 2016
The Cube
Monica McGarry’s work uses pop culture, kitsch and humour to challenge how people perceive and engage with images in the world around them. Her choice of material recalls a childhood fascination with glossy and shiny objects and materials. As we mature into adulthood, a fascination with eye-catching material remains, though perhaps our desire to interact with them lessens. The artist delves into how this perception changes as we get older and how we can be drawn back into an investigation of our surroundings, beyond appearances. Glitter, often a staple of children’s art projects, is used as the central medium in McGarry’s large scale painting to invite viewers to take in the shimmering surface more closely, while the text and interrogative titles of both the work and the exhibition wrestle with the seduction of this material, highlighting this uneasy relationship between criticality and the experience of wonder as we age.

McGarry's sculptural installation, Fluttering Iridescent Ribbon, references American conceptual artist Joseph Kosuth’s approach to representation in works such as his 1965 One and Three Chairs. Kosuth presented three incarnations of a chair including an actual chair, a photograph of a chair and a text panel with a description of a chair. McGarry treats the fluttering iridescent ribbon similarly, provoking the viewer to consider how meaning is constructed. McGarry’s installation playfully addresses notions of beauty and seduction and the underlying question: What is art? Together, the works in the exhibition reflect on how we assign meaning to objects and how we relate to images in the context of art making and viewing at a time when we are constantly bombarded by visual information.
Monica McGarry
Fluttering Iridescent Ribbon, 2016
mixed media, video projection
Courtesy of the Artist
Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Craig Willms, Kamloops Art Gallery
View images of the exhibition here.
July 2 to September 10, 2016
Central Gallery
Over the course of a career that spanned almost five decades, Jerry Pethick (1935–2003) produced a complex and multifaceted body of work that is difficult to classify. For much of this time he focused on the way in which models of observation – including linear perspective and cultural memory – shape our understanding of the world and our place in it. Through an extended emphasis on an object’s entanglement with its surroundings and the viewer’s consciousness, Pethick challenged culturally determined ways of perceiving space and the related separation of observer and object that has occupied a central position in Western thought since the 18th century.

Pethick saw disciplinary boundaries, linear conceptions of history and language itself as regimented structures of communication that limit perception to reductive binary models, such as inside/outside, mind/body and true/false. As Pethick once put it, “We learn to make choices between, we don’t perceive among.” His practice could be described as an ongoing attempt to deconstruct these models by exploring parallels in the methods of representation developed concurrently in the arts and sciences over the past two centuries, together with the perceptual systems that have been left in their wake.

While Pethick’s methods, materials and motifs find parallels in the larger realm of contemporary art, his pursuit of a sculptural idiom grounded in virtual space and transparency through idiosyncratic combinations of photographs, optical devices, found objects and a profound engagement with the science of perception was a largely singular journey. The unusual path Pethick took is embodied in his choice to live and work on Hornby Island in British Columbia, a remote and pastoral site frequented by artists and curators from Vancouver and abroad that is both connected to and distanced from the art world’s circuits of communication.

Pethick was born in 1935 in London, Ontario and died in 2003 on Hornby Island. He studied art in London, England at Chelsea Polytechnic and the Royal College of Art, where he completed graduate studies in 1964. He began to work with plastics and lenticular materials in the mid-1960s. Shortly after he became fascinated with holography and, along with the American scientist Lloyd Cross, established a holography school in San Francisco in 1971. Finding the elaborate technical demands of holography limiting, Pethick moved to Hornby Island in 1975, where he resided for the rest of his life. There he pursued his interest in the nature of perception while maintaining a modest economy of production by incorporating found objects sourced from the island’s recycling depot into his work. Over the past 40 years his art has been exhibited widely in Canada, the United States and Europe.

Jerry Pethick: Shooting the Sun/Splitting the Pie was organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art, in 2015 as the first exhibition to provide an overview of Pethick’s career. This exhibition comprises a smaller selection of works organized by the Kamloops Art Gallery with cooperation from the Vancouver Art Gallery.
Installation view of Shooting the Sun/Splitting the Pie showing Jerry Pethick
Before the End, 1995
photo array, plywood, aluminum, wood, silicone, watch glasses, Fresnel lenses, glass, fluorescent fixture, butyrate
Courtesy of Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver
Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art, Vancouver Art Gallery
Generously sponsored by Rojeanne and Jim Allworth, Jane Irwin and Ross Hill
View images of the exhibition here.
July 2 to September 10, 2016
The Cube
This year's Curator’s Choice is the 12th annual exhibition of work by a student graduating from Thompson Rivers University. Selected by Kamloops Art Gallery Assistant Curator Craig Willms, Curator’s Choice annually highlights talent from TRU’s Bachelor of Fine Arts graduating class and gives emerging artists an opportunity to create new work for a professional exhibition space outside the context of school. The 2016 Curator’s Choice exhibition features a new project by Ryland Fortie. Fortie’s research-based practice explores materials and video through multi-media installation. The exhibition title, Chatroom Paranoia, references virtual social spaces found on the Internet as a real time forum for exchanging ideas on particular topics. Through video, sculpture and synthetic objects like plastic fruit, artificial plants and plaster body parts, the artist examines how the lines between virtual and physical space, and therefore social interaction, are increasingly blurred.

Chatroom Paranoia is a multi-media installation that addresses various realities in relation to engagement with others. At a time when there are concerns about oversaturation from too much screen time and a lack of face-to-face engagement, Fortie considers whether these concerns are relevant or simply the way in which people engage socially now, using the technology of the day. In this new work, Fortie questions how meaning and identity are constructed within all social spaces, whether in-person or virtual, and invites the viewer to question notions of authenticity.
Installation view of Ryland Fortie: Chatroom Paranoia
Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Craig Willms, Kamloops Art Gallery
Generously sponsored by Cypress Insurance, OA Fine Arts Jewellery Insurance
View images of the exhibition here.
April 2 to June 18, 2016
Central Gallery
In 2014, the Kamloops Art Gallery received a bequest of works of art from the private collection of Hugh Hanson Davidson (1930-2014). Davidson was a generous benefactor to the Gallery. He donated a number of works in 1998, as well as his library of art books. The Gallery celebrated Davidson and his gift at a special reception in 2002, naming its library the Hugh Hanson Davidson Library. It was always Davidson’s intention to bequeath to the Gallery what remained in his collection, which he amassed over many decades.

Davidson spent virtually his entire life in the arts. His grandparents’ Westmount home in Montreal had works of art on the walls and contained objets d’art typical of the late Victorian and Edwardian mansions of the day. The well-known Canadian artist, Randolph Hewton, had been commissioned to paint his mother’s portrait in 1925. Though his primary interest was music, and most of his working life was as an arts administrator and music programmer for various agencies, including the CBC, the BBC, the Canadian High Commission in London, the National Arts Centre and the Canada Council, Davidson had an abiding interest in the visual arts. As a young man, he began to collect works that caught his eye and that he could afford. Later, especially during his years in Ottawa and Montreal, his taste reflected a greater awareness of contemporary art and a prime motivation was to support younger artists. This continued during his retirement years, when he moved first to Vancouver in 1988 and then to Victoria in 1998.

This exhibition celebrates a life in the arts. It presents work which Davidson inherited from his family and work he acquired throughout his life. Not only does this collection present an insightful survey of Canadian modern art, but it also shows how this collector’s acquisitions were informed by where he lived, where he travelled and what would give him lasting delight in his home.

This exhibition of approximately 100 works represents a collector’s biography, showing how the collection was formed, highlighting the dealers Davidson patronized and how his collecting activity became an expression of his support of artists and their work.

A coinciding publication is available.
Curated by Roger H. Boulet, Historical Canadian Art, Kamloops Art Gallery
Generously sponsored by Funk Signs Inc.
View images of the exhibition here.
March 19 to June 18, 2016
The Cube
Through her experimental drawings, Laura Hargrave recreates the experience of memory loss. With her back to the drawing surface Hargrave renders life-size figures as a way of challenging the normal observation and recording process of image creation. She draws blindly, relying only on memory for reference so that the resulting imagery takes on a mix of blind contour drawing and continuous line. The drawings are skewed and proportions take on a slightly altered look, playing with their relationship in space. Through this practice, Hargrave explores the loss of memory that comes with age and refl ects on its effects on friends and relatives. Figures in the drawings appear to wander the gallery as if lost or searching for something, both fl oating and grounding themselves across the walls of the gallery.

Laura Hargrave is a Kamloops-based artist working in experimental drawing, mixed media and installation. She obtained her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Victoria and her Master of Fine Arts from the University of Regina. In 2007, Hargrave participated in a seven-week international residency at the Banff Centre, Walking and Art. Her walking projects range from the subdivisions of Don Mills, Ontario to the Barringer Meteor Crater in Arizona. In 2010, she led a Jane's Walk, Frottage a Garage, in the back lanes of Kamloops to celebrate the memory of urban theorist Jane Jacobs.
Curated by Craig Willms, Kamloops Art Gallery
View images of the exhibition here.
January 16 to March 19, 2016
Central Gallery
Dianne Bos
Donald Lawrence
Andrew Wright
Lea Bucknell
Kevin Schmidt and Holly Ward
Michael Yuhasz
Ernie Kroeger
Carsten Wirth
Camera obscura is Latin for “darkened chamber” or “dark room.” It is a device that admits light through a small opening (often behind a glass lens) into a box or darkened room to project an upside down image of the outside world onto a surface opposite. German Astronomer Johannes Kepler coined the term “camera obscura” in 1604, but experiments with optical devices that eventually led to the creation of light-proof chambers with holes that act as a lens began by astronomers as early as the fourth century BCE. Cameras obscura were used in the Renaissance period to produce images and plans for linear perspective and in the eighteenth century for staging scientific experiments. It was through these observations and discoveries that we learned that the visual imprint of light on the retina is inverted. Theories of optics and the use of the camera obscura have driven philosophical inquiry into the nature of what we see and how we see in the world around us.

Conceived and organized by Kamloops-based artist and visual arts professor Donald Lawrence, The Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival was a far-reaching project funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada through Thompson Rivers University. The festival took place in Dawson City, Yukon, in the summer of 2015. It brought together an international group of artists and other researchers interested in cameras obscura and related optical phenomenon as a meeting place of art and science, cultural and wilderness settings. The festival was held during the summer solstice, taking advantage of the longest day of the year in order to allow the projects to be viewed most effectively. It featured multiple site-specific installations throughout Dawson and included coinciding exhibitions at the ODD Gallery and the SOVA Gallery. It also included a wide range of workshops, tours and public talks, all focused around the theme of the camera obscura.

The exhibition at the Kamloops Art Gallery provides a document of the festival and the projects made specifically for that event. Many of the artists are based in Kamloops and all share a converging interest in exploring the possibilities of the camera obscura. While an exhibition indoors is not able to replicate the off-site context and “wilderness” sensibility of the festival or include work by every artist involved, work in the exhibition embodies the sculptural innovation and progressive approach to the theme generated by a diverse group of artists.

Midnight Sun Camera Obscura shares gallery space with Out of Sight, an exhibition of historical photographs by Eadweard Muybridge and Harold Edgerton that expand our understanding of time and motion through the still image and is accompanied by a new project by Thompson Rivers University students in The Cube, Live Stream: Optical Rendering. Together, the exhibitions offer an opportunity to understand the history of optics and photography and contemporary approaches to these subjects.
Installation view of Midnight Sun Camera Obscura showing
Lea Bucknell
False Front, 2015
metallized polymer film and wood, and archival inkjet prints
Courtesy of the Artist
Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Charo Neville
Generously sponsored by MCM Real Estate Ltd.
View images of the exhibition here.
Out of Sight
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January 16 to March 19, 2016
Central Gallery
Harold E. Edgerton
Eadweard Muybridge
Out of Sight features a selection of photographs recently acquired by the Vancouver Art Gallery by Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904) and Harold Edgerton (1903-1990). Both artists are celebrated for their revolutionary works that expand our understanding of time and motion and extend the capacity of human perception by making time stand still. While time can be measured and evaluated, it also has a profound subjective dimension; how the passage of time is understood and felt is the product of individual experience, making its perception fluid, malleable and subject to interpretation. Both of these artists continually mined this rich terrain – how time can be represented and perceived – by manipulating and distorting the ways in which time functions to challenge our accepted views and preconceived notions.

The photographs of Muybridge and Edgerton depict slices of time – frozen moments – to approach the problem of representing that which cannot be seen. In their scientific experiments, they exploited the promise of the photographic medium to act as a defi nitive record of an action or event, essentially stopping time to depict the mechanical truth of movement. Brought together, these bodies of work explore ideas about perception and representation, challenging viewers to reconsider what we see in our everyday encounters.

Eadweard Muybridge is renowned for his sequential images of human and animal locomotion. From 1883 to 1886, while employed by the University of Pennsylvania, Muybridge produced more than 100,000 images that documented the common movements of people and animals and is known for his earliest stop-motion images of a running horse that proved that all four hooves of a horse left the ground when it was galloping. Using multiple cameras and elaborate triggering devices, Muybridge was able to virtually stop time and provide surprising and provocative insights into the mechanics and wonder of human and animal movement.

Harold Edgerton was a trained scientist who is credited with inventing ultra-high-speed, stroboscopic and stop-action photography to take picture of events that occurred too quickly, or too slowly, for the human eye to see. With his striking imagery, Edgerton transforms our understanding of temporal space and experience, redefining how we perceive movement by extending the capacity of the human eye.

Organized and circulated by the Vancouver Art Gallery with the generous support of the Killy Foundation.
Eadweard Muybridge
Plate 331 Boxing; stop for cross-buttocks (shoes), from Animal Locomotion, 188
collotype
Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of Claudia Beck and Andrew Gruft
Photo: Vancouver Art Gallery
Curated by Stephanie Rebick, Vancouver Art Gallery
Generously sponsored by MCM Real Estate Ltd
View images of the exhibition here.
January 16 to March 12, 2016
The Cube
Anyssa Gill
Dion Fortie
Alex Jensen
Levi Glass
Ryland Fortie
Monica McGarry
Running parallel with Midnight Sun Camera Obscura in the Central Gallery, Live Stream:Optical Rendering features a new project by Kamloops-based artists who took part in the exhibition Strange Things Done at the Yukon School of Visual Arts’ Confluence Gallery during the Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival in Dawson City, Yukon in the summer of 2015. Dion Fortie, Ryland Fortie and Levi Glass were among a group of emerging artists who created works that explored self-illuminated sculptural forms in relation to their research into cameras obscura.

For this new project, the artists have created do-it-yourself projectors that cast images onto The Cube walls, recalling the experimental sensibility of the early cameras obscura. Furthering an interest in the physical elements of image projection, the artists have invited other local emerging artists to create physical objects and provide images that make up the subject of the projected images. This collaborative project considers the content of the objects and projected images while drawing attention to the mechanical apparatus itself so that the multiple projections create a dynamic installation of both object and imagery.

Live Stream: Optical Rendering embraces a low-tech approach to projecting images that is linked to a long history of optical exploration embodied in the camera obscura. New approaches to this historical technology involve a consideration of the structure itself and the social possibilities of the camera obscura. These projects serve as a launching point for further investigation, bringing art, science and a do-it-yourself ethic together in a cultural setting.
Installation view of Live Stream: Optical Rendering
Photo: Cory Hope, Kamloops Art Gallery
Curated by Craig Willms, Kamloops Art Gallery
View images of the exhibition here.

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